TV review: Holy Flying Circus

TV review: Holy Flying Circus

Charles Edwards is extraordinary as Michael Palin in Holy Flying Circus(BBC4). Look on YouTube at the real 1979 Friday Night Saturday Morning, the show in which Palin and John Cleese were set upon by Malcolm Muggeridge and the Bishop of Southwark, and the incident that provides the climax for this biographical drama by Tony Roche. Edwards has him – gotcha! – in the net. It’s as if Palin has hopped off the travelator of time in his mid-thirties and hopped backed on again, 32 years later.

Darren Boyd is impressive as Cleese too, though he’s really playing Basil Fawlty, for some reason. Well, there is a little aside that addresses this. For a moment Boyd plays the real John Cleese; he explains, by way of a party political broadcast, illustrated by animation, that what we’re seeing is a fictional account of him, based loosely on the character of Basil Fawlty.

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The Good, The Bad and the Multiplex

The Good, The Bad and the Multiplex

Film critic Mark Kermode has been promoting his new book, “The Good, The Bad and the Multiplex”.  In the book, which we here at MindCorp have already got our inky little finger on, he expounds on the state of modern cinema and cinema-attending in general. And it’s not particularly flattering.

Detractors would argue that these multi-million dollar blockbusters make a lot of money at the box-office. Kermode’s argument however, as eloquently stated on BBC this morning, is that this is because cinema goers aren’t asked to pay on the way out. Just because they’ve paid to see the film it does not necessarily equate that they’ve enjoyed the film.

It’s a compelling argument and we recommend anyone with a passion for film as we have here at Mindcorp to have a perusal of its contents. Although, it does depend on ones view of critics. Again, as Mr Kermode mentioned in the aforementioned BBC interview – in a recent poll Mark Kermode was voted as the most trusted film critic in the U.K. today – but in the same poll, as he went on to explain, only 2% admitted that they paid any attention to what critics had to say.

If you are interested, the following is a review of ‘The Good, The Bad and the  Multiplex” published recently in the Guardian:

The Good, the Bad and the Multiplex by Mark Kermode – review. Mark Kermode’s polemic is both endearing and informative…

Mark Kermode, history will relate, is a man with an appropriately cinematic origin: his name, look, and place in cultural life are clearly the result of a failed experiment with a matter transporter in which the genomes of Frank Kermode and Mark Lamarr were accidentally spliced. Here is an erudite critic with a proper appreciation of schlock; a celluloid-loving fogey who candidly prefers Breathless to À Bout de Souffle; and a man with the vanity to sport a quiff, yet who identifies himself as a jowly doppelgänger for Richard Nixon. This is the book of his mid-life crisis. If he’s been a film critic for a quarter of a century (and, what’s more, the “most trusted” in the UK according to a 2010 YouGov poll), what’s the point of his existence when Sex and the City 2 is a smash hit?

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At MindCorp we specialise in TV, Film and Post Production Branding. Click here to learn more.

Troll Hunter review

Troll Hunter review

With its outlandish premise and great trailer, André Øvredal’s creature feature has guaranteed cult crossover status.

Combining plenty you’ve seen before (found footage, CG beasties) to create something new (a blackly comic Norwegian fantasy), it plows an odd little furrow, and will bemuse as much as beguile casual viewers.

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At MindCorp we specialise in TV, Film and Post Production Branding. Click here to learn more.

Our Day Will Come Review

Our Day Will Come review

Vincent Cassel is at his mercurial best in this jumpy, rage-filled road-movie, as a renegade psychiatrist who goads a young psychopath into a seaside rampage on behalf of beleaguered redheads like themselves.

Olivier Barthelemy, whose wary, brooding presence lets him punch at Cassel’s weight dramatically, is superb as the teenager unsure whether he’s a mess, or a Messiah.

Rookie director Romain Gavras (son of Costas-Gavras) directs his moody, meandering tale with a passion and originality that stops it turning into a French rip-off of Fight Club, but can’t muster the edgy excitement of his controversial 2010 video for MIA’s ‘Born Free’ (included, happily, on the DVD and Blu-ray).

SourcedFrom Sourced from: Total Film Reviews

At MindCorp we specialise in TV, Film and Post Production Branding. Click here to learn more.

Attenberg Review

Attenberg review

Sex and death come under the microscope in this offbeat Greek tale, centred on Marina (impressive newcomer Ariane Labed), a withdrawn young woman killing time in an industrial seaside town.

Her dying dad (Vangelis Mourikis) encourages her to embrace life; repelled by the idea of sexual intimacy, she takes refuge in David Attenborough nature docs and electropunk pioneers Suicide.

Director Athina Rachel Tsangari conjures some playful touches – animal imitations; Marina and friend Bella’s synchronised walks – but this clinically shot oddity ultimately mystifies.

SourcedFrom Sourced from: Total Film Reviews

At MindCorp we specialise in TV, Film and Post Production Branding. Click here to learn more.

The Hedgehog Review

The Hedgehog review

Based on Muriel Barbery’s novel, writer/director Mona Achache’s debut has a modern-day fairytale feel.

Ignored by her rich parents, precocious 11-year-old Paloma (Garance Le Guillermic) decides to end it all on her 12th birthday.

But she’s drawn into the lives of the secretly bookish concierge (Josiane Balasko, the metaphorical hedgehog of the title) and Japanese widower (Togo Igawa) who dwell in her Paris apartment block.

Highbrow nods (Ozu, Tolstoy) add preciousness, but this tale of unexpected emotional connections is charmingly acted and surprisingly moving.

SourcedFrom Sourced from: Total Film Reviews

At MindCorp we specialise in TV, Film and Post Production Branding. Click here to learn more.

Jane Eyre Review

Jane Eyre review

Having tackled one beloved English literary heroine in Alice In Wonderland, rising star Mia Wasikowska promptly has a crack at another in the latest take on Charlotte Brontë’s 1847 novel.

The elegant, brooding results could hardly be further removed from Tim Burton’s baroque whimsy, or from 2009’s Sin Nombre, the immigrant love story that precedes this film on Cary Joji Fukunaga’s eclectic directorial CV.

But just like Sin’s illegal wetbacks, orphan Jane is looking for a place to belong – somewhere where she isn’t resented and mistreated, like the childhood home she shares with her heartless aunt or the Dickensian charity school to which she’s subsequently consigned.

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At MindCorp we specialise in TV, Film and Post Production Branding. Click here to learn more.

Powder

Powder review

The biggest problem with most films about fictional bands is that they’re not Spinal Tap.

Adapting Kevin Sampson’s rock-lit exposé into an overwrought ramble through the shallow highs and bloated lows of fast-found indie success, first-time director Mark Elliot leaves the dial somewhat lower than 11.

Following teenage rockers The Grams from grungy nightclubs to a holiday in Ibiza, Liam Boyle lip-synchs awkwardly along to James Walsh’s voice and mopes around festivals looking troubled.

The cast make a sound effort, but sadly you’ll find a more searing indictment of the modern music scene in the Jonas Brothers movie.

SourcedFrom Sourced from: Total Film Reviews

At MindCorp we specialise in TV, Film and Post Production Branding. Click here to learn more.

Friends With Benefits

Friends With Benefits review

February release No Strings Attached might have got there first, but Friends With Benefits gets there better.

Mila Kunis is Jamie, a New York headhunter who lures LA art director Dylan (Justin Timberlake) east for a job at GQ. She throws in a personal tour of the city and thus begins a bi-coastal bonkfest that’s perfect for two wounded commitmentphobes. Only, as Natalie Portman could have told them, it’s rarely that simple.

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At MindCorp we specialise in TV, Film and Post Production Branding. Click here to learn more.

One Day

One Day review

One way to sidestep the pitfalls inherent in adapting a beloved novel: hire the author to pen the screenplay.

Yet while David Nicholls’ bestseller is already cinematic, with its snapshot structure and sparkling dialogue, his adap lifts scenes with their internal monologue inevitably lost. What’s left is a simple and effective love story that never gets too far beneath the surface.

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At MindCorp we specialise in TV, Film and Post Production Branding. Click here to learn more.

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