Tyrannosaur takes hat trick at British Independent Film Awards

Tyrannosaur takes hat trick at British Independent Film Awards

Paddy Considine collects best film and best debut director awards while Olivia Colman is best actress

Tyrannosaur, Paddy Considine’s gripping and gruelling study of rage, has become the biggest winner at the 14th British Independent Film Awards.

Starring Peter Mullan as a drinking, gambling, washed-up widower, it was surprise winner of the best film award from a particularly strong shortlist that included Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, Shame, Senna and We Need to Talk About Kevin.

It is not a first date movie, or rather would be one for unusual people. The tone is set in the first minutes when Mullan’s character kicks his dog to death after he is kicked out of the bookies. While it is not easy to watch, critics have showered the film with praise.

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The Iron Lady: first screening

The Iron Lady: first screening

Was it a dream or is it a nightmare? In the early years of the 21st century a frail old woman totters around her London home, assailed by memories that rise up unbidden. They tell her that her husband still lives, and that she remains the prime minister, the cherished daughter of a nation of shopkeepers, called upon to save Britain from ruin. For the old woman, these ghosts provide reassurance, a sunny remembrance of days gone by. Others, by contrast, may be hard pressed to keep the horrors at bay.

While one doubts whether Baroness Thatcher would wholeheartedly approve of any large screen biopic, it seems likely that she’d have a certain, sneaking affection for The Iron Lady, which prints the legend and keeps the dissent on spartan rations. Yes, the film provides glimpses of a blustering Michael Foot, and archive footage from the poll tax riots. At one stage angry protesters slap on the window of the heroine’s limo to tell her she’s “a monster”. Yet there’s little sense of the outside world, the human cost, or the ripple effect of divisive government policies. It is a movie that gives us Thatcher without Thatcherism.

The Iron Lady, directed by Phyllida Lloyd from an Abi Morgan script, opts for a breezy, whistle-stop tour through the unstable nitroglycerin of Thatcher’s life and times. The tone is jaunty and affectionate, a blend of Yes Minister and The King’s Speech, fuelled by flashbacks that bob us back through authorised history.

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Eunarchy in the UK: George Harrison’s first movie

Eunarchy in the UK: George Harrison

Long before The Life of Brian, George Harrison funded an award-winning film stuffed with British talent – so why has it taken 40 years to surface?

In 1979 George Harrison purchased, almost on a whim, what Terry Jones would later call “the most expensive movie ticket of all time”. After a single reading of the script ofMonty Python’s Life of Brian, he mortgaged his own luxury mansion and sank the resultant funds into a project that had been abandoned, days before shooting started, by its original backer, Bernie Delfont of EMI. Why did he do it? “Because I liked the script and I wanted to see the movie,” said Harrison later. A Beatle can do that.

From that almost informal exchange of favours between good friends sprang arguably the most interesting British production company of the 1980s, Handmade Films, backed by Harrison and his producing partner Denis O’Brien. Handmade gave us Brianand Withnail & IThe Long Good Friday and Mona Lisa, and the early work of Terry Gilliam. That legend is well known; less well known is that Brian was not Harrison’s first foray into film production; that distinction belongs to Stuart Cooper’s superb adaptation of David Halliwell’s play Little Malcolm and His Struggle Against the Eunuchs, retitled Little Malcolm. It was made in 1973, won the Silver Bear at Berlin in 1974, and then was lost to public view for nearly four decades as one of the many contested assets of what Cooper today calls “the Beatles‘ divorce”.

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Why does Amélie’s sweet smell of success linger on?

Why does Amélie

Ten years ago, Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s syrupy story about a simpering busybody, played by Audrey Tautou, became a worldwide hit. So why is the dream still not over in 2011?

I have it on good authority that Amélie turned Montmartre into a “tourist shithole”. The Café des 2 Moulins, the film’s key location, was flooded with sightseers, and sold on. Someone put a banner over Rue Lepicreading “Welcome to the quartier of Amélie Poulain”. Megaphones pumped out accordion music in the street, turning the area into some kind of Marcel Marceau wet dream. Amélie has that kind of effect. Watching it for the second time on the eve of its 10th-anniversary re-release, I still find Audrey Tautou‘s boulevard busybody simpering to the point of psychosis. (As our own Peter Bradshaw said of her flat-rearranging antics: “Does the director know that this is precisely what Charles Manson claimed to love doing?”).

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R.E.M in Films

R.E.M have recently called it quits after 30 years and 15 albums. Their forays into the world of film weren’t as pronounced as some other artistes. Michael Stipe, of course, is a producer, with the likes of Saved and Velvet Goldmine on his CV, while Mike Mills has dabbled in the world of soundtracks. But besides that level of involvement, and all the films that share names with R.E.M. songs – King Of Comedy, Drive, Let Me In and Hollow Man to name but four – the band have been influenced by movies, primarily lyrically. Take the following, for example…

Lifes Rich Pageant

The name of the band’s fourth – and, in some ways, best – album, taken from a Peter Sellers quote from A Shot In The Dark, “It’s all part of life’s rich pageant”. The sub editor-baiting title, which really should have an apostrophe, is down to an error by Stipe, who typed it up manually and then, being a daffy stream-of-consciousness sort, decided he liked it. And why not? Clouseau would approve.



Man On The Moon

The group’s most famous contribution to the world of film, they – or, at least, Buck and Mills – wrote the soundtrack for Milos Forman’s excellent biopic of Andy Kaufman (Jim Carrey), who was immortalized in the R.E.M. song of the same name. The soundtrack is at times haunting: Miracle is excellent, as is the instrumental version of the title track, while an in-character Carrey duets with Stipe on the jaunty ‘This Friendly World’.



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Emmy winners 2011: full list

Emmy winners 2011: full list

Modern Family writers Jeffrey Richman and Steven Levitan and director Michael Spiller with their 2011 Emmy awards. Photograph: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

Modern Family dominates comedy while Downton Abbey takes miniseries, directing, supporting actor and writing gongs.

Best drama series: Mad Men

Actor in a drama series: Kyle Chandler, Friday Night Lights

Actress in a drama series: Julianna Margulies, The Good Wife

Supporting actor in a drama series: Peter Dinklage, Game of Thrones

Supporting actress in a drama series: Margo Martindale, Justified

Best comedy series: Modern Family

Actor in a comedy series: Jim Parsons, The Big Bang Theory

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Toronto film fest offers Oscar bids in strong market

Coming off a robust first half of 2011 for independent films, the Toronto film festival kicks off on Thursday with expectations for a generous amount of business deals, Hollywood star power and Oscar hopefuls.

Film fans and industry pros are heading into this week’s festival, which will screen 268 feature throughout 11 days, in a buoyant mood following strong movie lineups and dealmaking at the Cannes and Sundance festivals earlier this year.

Adding to their optimism for the Toronto International Film Festival TIFF is a full roster of Hollywood A-listers among the event’s movies, ranging from George Clooney and Brad Pitt to U2, Pearl Jam and Madonna.

Moreover, attendees will all be looking at a group of films that might turn into Oscar contenders following on from last year’s “The King’s Speech,” which won top prize at TIFF.

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George Harrison – Martin Scorsese’s new documentary reveals the candid truth

George Harrison – Martin Scorsese


Previously unseen private letters, home movie footage and intimate personal recollections of George Harrison are set to radically correct public perceptions of “the quiet Beatle” in a new documentary by Martin Scorsese.

Revelations include the fact that Harrison’s widow, Olivia, struggled to keep the relationship with her wayward husband on track. In the film Eric Clapton also talks about how he felt consumed with envy as he fell in love with Pattie Boyd, Harrison’s first wife.

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No director yet for Thor 2

No director yet for Thor 2

TF thought the search for a Thor 2 director was done and dusted, with TV veteran Brian Kirk (Games Of Thrones, Boardwalk Empire, Dexter) in talks to land the job. But an interview with Avengers star Tom Hiddleston – AKA Loki in Thor – suggests the post hasn’t yet been filled and he hasn’t spoken to Kirk.  ”I haven’t. I also don’t know that that’s actually confirmed,” Hiddleston told MTV. “That’s not me being coy. I spoke to Kevin Feige last week on [The Avengers] set and he said, ‘Oh no, we haven’t got anyone yet. We’re thinking about people. I think [Kirk's] name is definitely in the hat, but I don’t think anything is solid.” Hiddleston said the film would probably start shooting next spring and the storyline will likely pick-up where The Avengers finishes. ”In The Avengers he’s really dark and kind of sociopathic, or maybe even psychopathic is the word, in a deluded way,” he explained. “Obviously I haven’t let go of the spiritual damage at the heart of him, it still comes from that lost place, but he’s just incredibly nasty. I think that probably in Thor 2… he’ll have to take responsibility for what he’s done.” ”The great thing about Loki is there is potential in him for greatness and awfulness, for great heroism and great villainy,” Hiddleston continued. “There are still, even within The Avengers, there are moments where you see within Loki a glimmer of hope and that possibility of redemption.” Could that see Thor and Loki teaming up?  “I for one am championing the redemption. This isn’t definitely going to happen, but I think there would be nothing more awesome than seeing Loki and Thor fight somebody side by side,” Hiddleston added. 

SourcedFrom Sourced from: Total Film News

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Mark Bomback to rewrite The Wolverine

Mark Bomback (Jack The Giant Killer, the Total Recall reboot) has been handed scripting duties for The Wolverine ahead of next year’s shoot. Christopher McQuarrie wrote the current version of the script, with director James Mangold on board to direct.  The plot sees Hugh Jackman’s X-Man searching for clues to his past amongst the Japanese criminal underworld, finding love but suffering tragedy along the way.  The shoot is still expected to begin in Tokyo and Vancouver next year, as soon as Jackman finishes shooting Les Miserables. Filming had originally been planned for November 2011 in Vancouver.  Bomback’s previous work includes scripts for Live Free Or Die Hard, Unstoppable and the Jackman film Deception.

SourcedFrom Sourced from: Total Film News

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